Aeshna subarctica

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Aeshna subarctica
Aeshna subarctica Jarosław Wenta Ciepłówka k. Kościeliska.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Odonata
Infraorder: Anisoptera
Family: Aeshnidae
Genus: Aeshna
Species:
A. subarctica
Binomial name
Aeshna subarctica
Walker, 1908

Aeshna subarctica, the subarctic darner, is a species of darner in the family Aeshnidae.[2][3][4][5] It is found in Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China) and North America.[2]

The IUCN conservation status of Aeshna subarctica is "LC", least concern, with no immediate threat to the species' survival. The population is stable.[1][6]

Subarctic darner, Aeshna subarctica
Subarctic darner, Aeshna subarctica

Subspecies

These two subspecies belong to the species Aeshna subarctica:

  • Aeshna subarctica elisabethae Djakonov, 1922 c g
  • Aeshna subarctica subarctica Walker, 1908 i g

Data sources: i = ITIS,[7] c = Catalogue of Life,[8] g = GBIF,[9] b = Bugguide.net[10]

References

  1. ^ a b "List of Endangered Species". IUCN Red List. Retrieved 2018-03-15.
  2. ^ a b "Aeshna subarctica Report". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2018-03-15.
  3. ^ "Aeshna subarctica species details". Catalogue of Life. Retrieved 2018-03-15.
  4. ^ "Aeshna subarctica". GBIF. Retrieved 2018-03-15.
  5. ^ "Aeshna subarctica Species Information". BugGuide.net. Retrieved 2018-03-15.
  6. ^ "Odonata Central". Retrieved 2018-03-15.
  7. ^ "ITIS, Integrated Taxonomic Information System". Retrieved 2018-03-15.
  8. ^ "Catalogue of Life". Retrieved 2018-03-15.
  9. ^ "GBIF, Global Biodiversity Information Facility". Retrieved 2018-03-15.
  10. ^ "Bugguide.net". Retrieved 2018-03-15.

Further reading

  • Abbott, John C. (2005). Dragonflies and Damselflies of Texas and the South-Central United States. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0691113647.
  • Arnett, Ross H. Jr. (2000). American Insects: A Handbook of the Insects of America North of Mexico (2nd ed.). CRC Press. ISBN 0-8493-0212-9.
  • Ball-Damerow, J.E.; Oboyski, P.T.; Resh, V.H. (2015). "California dragonfly and damselfly (Odonata) database: temporal and spatial distribution of species records collected over the past century". ZooKeys. 482. doi:10.3897/zookeys.482.8453.
  • Dunkle, Sidney W. (2000). Dragonflies Through Binoculars: A Field Guide to Dragonflies of North America. Oxford Press. ISBN 978-0195112689.
  • Needham, James G.; Westfall Jr., Minter J. Jr.; May, Michael L. (2000). Dragonflies of North America. Scientific Publishers. ISBN 0-945417-94-2.
  • Nikula, Blair; Loose, Jennifer L.; Burne, Matthew R. (2003). Field Guide to the Dragonflies and Damselflies of Massachusetts. Massachusetts Division of Fisheries & Wildlife.
  • Silsby, Jill (2001). Dragonflies of the World. Smithsonian Institution Press. ISBN 978-1560989592.
  • Steinmann, Henrik (1997). Wermuth, Heinz; Fischer, Maximilian (eds.). World Catalogue of Odonata, Volume II: Anisoptera. Das Tierreich. 111. Walter de Gruyter. ISBN 3-11-014934-6.

External links

  • Media related to Aeshna subarctica at Wikimedia Commons


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